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Golden Hour – March 23rd – FREE

March 20, 2011

GOLDEN HOUR 23rd March, 8pm   This month with:  Amy Yang - New voice, new poems. Morag Edward — dark modern Scottish urban fiction. Robin J. Thompson — Leave Your humanity at the door. Robin launches “Leave Your humanity at the door.”  Jen and the Gents —- Poppy loveliness which warms all the cold bits.Panda Su — raw emotional honesty and blunt lyricism framed with an impressive array of strange and wonderful instruments.The Chans — unstoppable, upbeat Scottish Soul Music! Boom!

The GOLDEN HOUR
23rd March, 8pm

FREE, BYOB

This month with:

Rosie Phenix-Walker – New voice, new stories.
Morag Edward — dark modern Scottish urban fiction.

Robin J. Thompson — Leave Your humanity at the door. Robin launches “Leave Your humanity at the door.”

Jen and the Gents —- Poppy loveliness which warms all the cold bits.
Panda Su — raw emotional honesty and blunt lyricism framed with an impressive array of strange and wonderful instruments.
The Chans — unstoppable, upbeat Scottish Soul Music! Boom!

March Madness at the GH… 23 March

March 18, 2011

The Golden Hour – 23 March – FREE

This month we’ve got a spectacular line-up of bands and exciting new writers — all fresh to the GH stage!

23 March – The Forest – BYOB – FREE – 8pm

Featuring:

Amy Yang – New voice, new poems.
Morag Edward — dark modern Scottish urban fiction. See her writings – here.
Robin J. Thompson — Leave Your humanity at the door. Robin launches “Leave Your humanity at the door.”
Jen and the Gents — Poppy loveliness which warms all the cold bits.
Panda Su — raw emotional honesty and blunt lyricism framed with an impressive array of strange and wonderful instruments.
The Chans — unstoppable, upbeat Scottish Soul Music! Boom!

Emily Dickinson on the SPL Podcast

March 16, 2011

An Emily Dickinson Tour

Emily Dickinson

Practically everyone knows of Emily Dickinson and many have an opinion about what makes her so fascinating — is it her that intrigues us or or is it her work? I’m particularly proud of this podcast mostly thanks to the articulate and interesting Dickinson experts and fans I got to speak with and who, I hope, will inspire you to look at Dickinson again. Also, there are some lovely readings by our friend Emily Ballou who, allegedly, is something of a Dickinson fanatic. Enjoy the show!

We visit Amherst, Massachusetts, home of Emily Dickinson, where Ryan talks with Dickinson experts Tevis Kimble, curator of special collections at the Jones Library, Emily Dickinson House director Jane Wald as well as the charming poet and tour guide Henk Rossouw.

Presented by Ryan Van Winkle. Produced by Colin Fraser of Anon Poetry Magazine. Twitter: @byleaveswelive & @anonpoetry. Mail: splpodcast@gmail.com

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Or subscribe without iTunes (RSS)

Listen now…

Or download as MP3.

First published Sunday 16 January, 2011

About Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson “Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) was a poet with an exceptional ability to distill ‘amazing sense’ from ‘ordinary meanings.’ Her poetry is now considered among the finest in the English language.

Yet much about this fascinating figure’s life and work is misunderstood. Often caricatured in popular culture as a white-clad recluse who poured out morbid verse in the sanctuary of her bedroom, Emily Dickinson was a serious artist whose intellectual curiosity and emotional intensity are revealed in concise and compelling poems that capture a range of human experiences.”

Text: © www.emilydickinsonmuseum.org

About Jane Wald

Emily Dickinson Museum Jane Wald is the Director of the Emily Dickinson Museum in Amherst, Mass. She graduated from Bryn Mawr College, studied historical archaeology at the College of William and Mary and received a graduate degree in American history from Princeton University. Prior to her tenure at the Emily Dickinson Museum, Wald served as assistant director of development and marketing at Old Sturbridge Village and director of The Evergreens, under the Martha Dickinson Bianchi Trust. Upon the merger of the Homestead and The Evergreens in 2003, she became the museum’s associate director.

About Tevis Kimball

Tevis Kimball Tevis Kimball is the curator of special collections at Jones Library, Amherst, where she is also acting Director.

About Henk Rossouw

Henk Rossouw Henk lives in Amherst, Massachusetts, U.S.A., where he’s studying towards his MFA in Creative Writing at the University of Massachusetts. Currently, he works as an adviser to undergraduate students.

Related links…

We are delighted to have Emily Ballou read Emily Dickinson’s poems on this podcast. You can listen to Emily Ballou’s podcast in our archive.

Extrava-StAnza! Wed. 16th…

March 15, 2011

Join the Golden Hour up in St Andrews at StAnza, Scotland’s International Poetry Festival.

We’ll be brining a lively programme of poetry and music with Ryan Van Winkle + guests.

March 16th, 2011
7:30-9pm
The Byre Theatre, Abbey Street, St Andrews
Free! Free! Free!

Readings by:

Ryan Van Winkle — Long stories and short poems from The Scottish Poetry Library’s Reader in Residence. His book ‘Tomorrow, We Will Live Here’ was recently published by Salt.

William Letford — Poet. Roofer. Gentleman. He will feature in the forthcoming anthologies: New Poetries 5 (Carcanet), and Scotland – The Wave of Change.

Music By:

Hailey Beavis — subtle guitar, a bed for a voice, both personal and touching.

John Langan Band — an extravagant, eclectic three-piece melding Celtic, Balkan, Gypsy swing, and progressive music into a remarkably high-octane and super big sound.

Also – since we know you can’t get enough of us, after the party is the AFTERPARTY:

Golden Hour After Hour Party

10pm,

Aikman’s on Bell Street, St Andrews

Hailey Beavis – angel-voiced mama getting devilish on 6 strings.

John Langan Band – extravagant, eclectic three-piece melding celtic, balkan, gypsy swing and progressive music

Can’t wait can’t wait can’t wait!

Tomorrow, We Will Live Here in Gutter

March 13, 2011

Review of ‘Tomorrow, We Will Live Here’ in Gutter Magazine.

Gutter, features new Scottish writing and has been an exciting magazine to read since its very first issue. Not only have they published my work but this issue features some of my great and excellent friends. In here you’ll find new work from  Kirstin Innes, Jason Donald, Rodge Glass, Anneliese Mackintosh, Dilys Rose, Colin Will, Jim Carruth, Brian Johnstone, Andy Jackson, Jane Flett, Brian Johnstone, Cynthia Rogerson, Andrew Philip, Nick Holdstock, Nalini Paul, Doug Johnstone, Pippa Goldschmidt, Ross McGregor, Alexander Hutchison, & Donald S Murray.

If you like new writing from Scotland  — you’ll love this issue!

There’s also a super lovely review of Kei Miller’s recent novel and book of poetry both of which I also recommend. If anyone out there is looking for a great book of poems which isn’t mine — go get Kei’s ‘A Light Song of Light.’

Also, while I encourage you to buy this action-packed issue of Gutter (lord knows, we have to support these things) here is a condensed excerpt:

The debut collection by the Scottish Poetry Library’s American-born Reader in Residence is nothing short of excellent. There is a small-town, downtrodden, careworn feel but as Van Winkle bumps the reader along the back roads of country America – and Scotland – his urgent narrative voices rapidly dispel any air of despondency. These are compelling, self-assured, driven poems that shine a longing, elegaic laserbeam at their subjects.

Like a Bill Callaghan lyric, the poems tackle the grave stuff of human existence – love, loss, lust, religion, dislocation (spiritual and topographical), guilt – with a tenderly sardonic, noir-ish humour. Subjects from road kill, a fat boy, through a pastor’s son, deceitful lovers on September 11th, to the rain-soaked wishes of a condemned man are each addresssed by narrators who are edgy, uncomfortable and acutely aware of their failings.

It is hard to determine exactly how Van Winkle’s poems do their work, but they burrow into the reader’s skin like a mite to leave a persistent itch in the memory. The language is clean: WC Williams’ ‘plain American that cats and dogs can read’, but with syntax that is at times polysyndetic and mesmerising: as if a character out of Faulker, Twain or Cormac McCarthy character has stepped off the page to charm, disarm and then shock the reader …. This is a rich, incandescent book to keep at your bedside for dark winter nights.

You can buy ‘Tomorrow, We Will Live Here’ from Salt Publishing.

And get your copy of Gutter from their website.

You’ll find more reviews on my ‘reviews page‘.

Dying Villiages on the SPL Podcast

March 12, 2011

Poems from a Dying Village "You follow the red road and it leads you to the empty inn" - Rimbaud

“You follow the red road and it leads you to the empty inn” – Rimbaud

Award winning Scottish poet Tom Pow takes us on a tour of his remarkable Dying Villages poetry project which was exhibited here at the Scottish Poetry Library last year. The project is aimed at responding in poetry and prose to the social, ecological and cultural effects of demographic changes on villages in Europe. Check out http://www.dyingvillages.com or Tom’s own site http://www.tompow.co.uk

Presented by Ryan Van Winkle. Produced by Colin Fraser of Anon Poetry Magazine. Twitter: @byleaveswelive & @anonpoetry. Mail: splpodcast@gmail.com

Subscribe with ITunes

Or subscribe without iTunes (RSS)

Listen now…

Or download as MP3.

First published Sunday 9 January, 2011

About Tom Pow

Tom Pow Tom Pow was born in Edinburgh and now lives in Dumfries. He was poet in residence at the StAnza poetry festival in 2005. He has published several books for children, and the record of a poets’ correspondence and poems, Sparks!, with Diana Hendry. Landscapes and Legacies (iynx, 2003), his fourth collection of poems, was short-listed for the Scottish Arts Council’s Book of the year Award. Dear Alice: Narratives of Madness (Salt, 2007) won the poetry category in the Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust Book Awards 2009, in partnership with the Scottish Arts Council. His latest book is In The Becoming: New and Selected Poems (Polygon 2009).

In 2007, he was given a Creative Scotland Award for a project concerning dying villages in Europe. He is an Honorary Senior Research Fellow at Glasgow University, Dumfries; lectures for Lancaster University on its Distance Learning MA in Creative Writing; and is a registered member of the Scottish Storytelling Network.

About Dying Villages

By 2030 it is estimated that Europe will have lost one third of its population. It is already an ageing population with a low birthrate. The effect of this demographic change – the greatest since the Black Death – will be felt most acutely in rural areas. In 2007, Tom received a Creative Scotland Award from the Scottish Arts Council for a project aimed at responding in poetry and prose to the social, ecological and cultural effects of demographic changes on villages in Europe.

In 2007 and 2008, he made trips to affected areas in Spain, France, Germany, Poland, Bulgaria, Russia and Greece. The Dying Village website reflects these trips in sound, image, interviews and artworks.

Dying Villages is an ongoing project. Related works of poetry and prose will appear elsewhere.

Dying Villages website

Rob Mackenzie on the SPL Podcast

March 8, 2011

Rob A. MackenzieRob A Mackenzie © Gerry Cambridge

We chat with Rob A. Mackenzie, author of The Opposite Of Cabbage (Salt), associate editor at Magma magazine and organiser of the monthly Poetry At… series. Rob discusses what he’s working on at the moment, his views on criticism and the poetry industry and we get to hear a few of his recent poems. Produced by Colin Fraser of Anon Poetry Magazine. Twitter: @byleaveswelive & @anonpoetry. Mail: splpodcast@gmail.com

Subscribe with ITunes

Or subscribe without iTunes (RSS)

Listen now…

Or download as MP3.

First published Tuesday 14 December, 2010

About Rob A Mackenzie

Rob A Mackenzie © Gerry Cambridge Rob A. Mackenzie was born and brought up in Glasgow. He received a law degree from Aberdeen University and then abandoned the possibility of significant personal wealth by switching to theology at Edinburgh University. He wrote over seven hundred songs and doubled on guitar and saxophone for cult art-rock bands Pure Television and Plastic Chicken. Despite airplay on Radio Scotland and a rash of gigs in tiny Glasgow pubs, he failed miserably to achieve rock stardom. He spent a year in Seoul, eight years in a Lanarkshire housing scheme, five years in Turin, and now lives in Edinburgh with his wife and daughter where he organises the Poetry at the… reading series by night and works as a Church of Scotland minister by day. His pamphlet collection, The Clown of Natural Sorrow, was published by HappenStance Press in 2005 and The Opposite of Cabbage by Salt in 2009. His poems, articles and criticism have featured in many literary publications over the last decade or so. He is an associate editor with Magma magazine. He blogs at Surroundings and at the Magma blog

  • Rob’s blog, Surroundings
  • Magma blog

    We recommend…

    The Opposite of Cabbage The Opposite of Cabbage
    by Rob A. Mackenzie

    Salt Publishing, 2009

    Rob’s first full collection (launched here at the library in March 2009) of which Happenstance publisher Helena Nelson said ” Restrained, intelligent, quietly ironic poems, so precise and assured in their craft that they sometimes sail into liquid light.”

    SPL shelfmark: 3.Macken.

    The Clown of Natural Sorrow The Clown of Natural Sorrow
    by Rob A. Mackenzie

    Happenstance Press, 2005

    Rob’s debut pamphlet from award-winning Happenstance Press is completely sold out, but we have copies for you to borrow and browse here in the library.

    SPL shelfmark: p 3.Macken.

Related links…

    Withered Hand in the USA

    March 7, 2011

    Go See Withered Hand

    Good News - Release in USA on Absolutely Kosher due March 2011 Cover Art

    Friends in America — my pal, Withered Hand, will be playing a handful of dates in the US to launch his spectacular début, ‘Good News’. The album is out from Absolutely Kosher Records — the same people who bring you The Mountain Goats. I’ve been lucky enough to tour around a bit with Withered Hand and have seen him play dozens of times and it always as revelatory as it is celebratory. You can check out the record on bandcamp if you don’t believe me but, trust me, if you like good lyrics and and anti-folky music you’ll massively enjoy his gig. Withered Hand is a writer of catchy, sometimes dirty, always thoughtful songs that speak directly to you. Go. Enjoy. Let me know what you think.

    But don’t take my word for it:

    * Mojo Magazine gave his record four stars.

    * His fans include Jarvis Cocker, Frightened Rabbit, and McSweeny’s Magazine.

    * The Herald writes: ‘Willson is a one-man Fleet Foxes with a voice that, one moment, sounds on the brink of collapse; the next, is filled with humour, emotion and self-knowledge. It is quite some time since a debut release has placed 10 such perfect songs back to back.”

    You can find him in New York, Austin, San Francisco and LA.

    USA solo dates

    12 March LITTLEFIELD w/The Morgues, Brooklyn, NYC

    14 March CAKESHOP NYC w/Simon Says No, Kid Canaveral, Rachel Sermani

    14 March ROCKWOOD MUSIC HALL NYC w/King Creosote

    16 March SXSW, IODA SXSW OPENING DAY BASH @ EMO’S ANNEX 12pm

    16 March SXSW – Official SXSW Showcase @ Maggie Mae’s 8pm

    17 March SXSW – End of an Ear Records, 1pm, Instore, Austin Texas

    17 March SXSW, Waterloo Cycles, 3pm, Austin, Texas

    20 March HEMLOCK TAVERN, San Francisco

    22 March HOTEL CAFE w/King Creosote, Los Angeles

    <httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G-bJSOrFFY4&feature=player_embedded>

    Withered Hand – Religious Songs

    Tessa Ransford on the SPL Podcast

    March 4, 2011

    Tessa RansfordTessa outside the old Scottish Poetry Library in Tweeddale Court in 1984

    Tessa was the founding director of the SPL — that magical place of all things good about poetry. We had a lovely and graciously long chat over tea and I do hope you’ll enjoy listening!

    *

    In a special double podcast extravaganza, Ryan chats with founding director of the Scottish Poetry Library, Tessa Ransford. In part one, they discuss the founding of the Library and Tessa’s own memories of the Edinburgh poetry scene including Norman MacCaig. In part two Tessa talks about the early days of the library, the opening event in 1984 and its role in the invention of Vegetarian Haggis, the Iain Crichton Smith poem which inspired the new building and we get to hear a few of her poems. Presented by Ryan Van Winkle.

    Produced by Colin Fraser of Anon Poetry Magazine. Twitter: @byleaveswelive & @anonpoetry. Mail: splpodcast@gmail.com

    Subscribe with ITunes

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    Part 1:

    Or download as MP3.

    First published Tuesday 1 December, 2010

    Part 2:

    Or download as MP3.

    First published Thursday 4 December, 2010

    About Tessa Ransford

    Tessa Ransford. Photo by Michael Knowles Tessa Ransford was born in India, educated in Scotland and has lived all her adult life in Scotland apart from eight years working in Pakistan in the 1960s.

    She has published sixteen books of poems since the mid-seventies, the most recent being Not Just Moonshine, her ‘New and Selected Poems’ from Luath Press, Edinburgh, 2008.

    Tessa has led a busy working life as founder/director of the Scottish Poetry Library since it opened in 1984 until after its establishment in new premises in 1999, as founder/organiser of the School of Poets poetry workshop (1981-99) and as editor of Lines Review poetry magazine from 1988 until its final issue, number 144 in 1998. Poems, essays and articles have been published in many magazines and anthologies and in translation. She is now working as a freelance poetry adviser and practitioner, with special interest in relating poetry to those working creatively in other fields.

    Tessa was a fellow of Royal Literary Fund (working since 2001 at the Centre for Human Ecology in Edinburgh) and another RLF fellowship (2006-8) at Queen Margaret University. She set up the Callum Macdonald Memorial Award to encourage the publishing of poetry in pamphlets. It organises an annual Christmas pamphlet fair with the support of the National Library of Scotland and other sales/fairs for pamphlets throughout the year. She was president of International PEN, Scottish Centre, as from September 2003 to the end of 2006 and the commencement of its 80th anniversary year. Luath Press, Edinburgh has recently published her New and Selected Poems: Not Just Moonshine.

    Related links..

    Golden Hour Goes Stanza – March 16

    March 2, 2011

    THE GOLDEN HOUR goes to StAnza!

    A lively programme of poetry and music with Ryan Van Winkle and guests.

    March 16th, 2011
    7:30-9pm
    The Byre Theatre, Abbey Street,
    St Andrews
    Free! Free! Free!

    Readings by:

    Ryan Van Winkle — Long stories and short poems from The Scottish Poetry Library’s Reader in Residence. His book ‘Tomorrow, We Will Live Here’ was recently published by Salt.

    William Letford — Poet. Roofer. Gentleman. He will feature in the forthcoming anthologies: New Poetries 5 (Carcanet), and Scotland – The Wave of Change.

    Music By:

    Hailey Beavis — subtle guitar, a bed for a voice, both personal and touching.

    John Langan Band — an extravagant, eclectic three-piece melding Celtic, Balkan, Gypsy swing, and progressive music into a remarkably high-octane and super big sound.





    See you in St Andrews!


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